The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
    Eastern Michigan University
   
 
  Oct 22, 2017
 
 
    
2013-2014 Graduate Catalog THIS IS NOT THE CURRENT CATALOG. LINKS AND CONTENT ARE OUT OF DATE!

The Graduate Experience


Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.


Message from the Associate Provost and Associate Vice President For Graduate Studies and Research


I am delighted to welcome you to the Eastern Michigan University Graduate School. Our 4,500 graduate students come from nearly every state in the US and more than 80 countries worldwide to study with distinguished faculty dedicated to excellence in teaching and research. We offer more than 190 post baccalaureate degrees and certificates, many applied, in a wide range of specializations. These programs provide valuable pathways for enhancing current and future employment opportunities, as well as pursuing more advanced degrees.

Graduate study is more than a continuation of your undergraduate experience. It is a challenging, in-depth undertaking that requires independence of thought and dedication. Faculty become more than instructors; they are your advisors, mentors, and colleagues in search of improved job skills and advances in basic knowledge. Your graduate career is certain to be an exhilarating and thought-provoking experience that can alter your life in profound ways.

Finally, I would note that the Ypsilanti - Ann Arbor area is recognized worldwide as one of the most vibrant, diverse, intellectually and culturally stimulating urban environments in the U.S. – an outstanding setting for your graduate experience.

In closing, let me thank you for your interest in graduate education at Eastern Michigan University and wish you great success in your future studies!

Jeffrey Kentor
Associate Provost and Associate Vice President
For Graduate Studies and Research

Admission

General Procedures


Complete and submit to the Office of Admissions all required documents and materials. Official transcripts sent to EMU directly from the institution are required for all institutions (graduate and undergraduate) attended. The following priority deadlines have been established for receipt of all application materials required for admission to a graduate program:

Semester/Session
Fall
Winter
Summer
  Domestic Students
Feb. 1
Sept. 1
Feb. 1
  International Students
Feb. 1
Sept. 1
Feb 1

Applications received after the priority deadline will be processed in the order received. Admission can not be guaranteed if materials are submitted after May 15. Newly admitted students may not change programs two weeks prior to the start of the semester.

Some programs have deadlines different from those stated above. Prospective applicants are advised to verify the program deadline with their academic department or its web site.

Applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate English language proficiency by submitting official test scores. Required tests and minimum scores are available from the Office of Admissions or its website.

Individual departments may require higher scores than the Graduate School. Students who score below the minimum required by their department may be admitted conditionally and will be placed in ESL courses. These assigned ESL courses will be in addition to the student’s departmental program of study. The ESL condition does not affect a student’s enrollment or visa status.

Doctoral Degree
Admission Requirements

Requirements for admission to a doctoral degree program include the following:

  1. Submission of the completed Application for Graduate Admission, nonrefundable application fee and all official graduate and undergraduate transcripts to the Office of Admissions;

  2. The earned equivalent of a four-year, U.S. bachelor’s degree or master’s degree from an accredited college or university;

  3. A minimum cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in the master’s degree or, for those departments admitting directly from the bachelor’s degree, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants who do not meet minimum admission requirements may be considered for conditional admission (see below). Some departments require higher minimum GPAs; see specific program requirements;

  4. Other departmental admission requirements, such as standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, personal statements, portfolios and interviews, as listed under the individual programs;

  5. A statement of financial responsibility for those who are or will be on an F-1 or J-1 visa; and

  6. Demonstration of English language proficiency, by applicants whose native language is not English (see International Applicants, below).

The application and all supporting documents become the property of Eastern Michigan University and will not be returned to the applicant. Applicants are not admitted to the Graduate School and/or an academic program until they have been notified in writing of acceptance by the Office of Admissions.

Transfer Credit

Post-baccalaureate degrees earned at Eastern Michigan University or another accredited institution may be applied to a student’s program of study at the discretion of the student’s doctoral program. With the exception of post-baccalaureate degrees, no more than 12 hours of transfer credit may normally be applied to a doctoral program. Exceptions to this policy require the approval of the department head and Graduate School.

Academic Probation and Dismissal

Students are placed on academic probation at the end of any semester in which their cumulative EMU grade point average in courses taken for graduate credit is below 3.0. Probationary students who do not return to good academic standing by the end of the next two enrollment periods are dismissed from the University and are so notified in writing.

Doctoral students may be dismissed from a program if program requirements are not met. Individual departments may specify additional grounds for dismissal. Students who are dismissed from a program while in good academic standing may still be eligible for another graduate program at EMU.

Time Limit for Completing Degree

Doctoral students must complete all requirements for the degree within seven years of the date of first enrollment. An extension of the seven-year time limit is permitted only upon recommendation of the student’s dissertation committee and by the doctoral program director with the approval of the department head and Graduate School.

Residency

Although the Graduate School does not require a specific period of campus residency, it nevertheless encourages the efforts of graduate programs to create a cohesive intellectual community.

Some EMU graduate programs do enforce a residency requirement even if the Graduate School does not. Students should check with their advisers and program descriptions to determine specific expectations and requirements. These may vary from one program to the next and may include attendance at guest lectures or conferences, or even specific periods of enrollment on the main campus.

Faculty Participation in Doctoral Programs

Criteria and procedures for assigning faculty to teach doctoral-level courses, to chair or serve on dissertation committees, and to perform other tasks associated with doctoral programs are defined by the degree-offering department, with specific assignments formally reviewed at regular intervals by the department head with faculty input.

Course Requirements

Doctoral students are normally expected to complete the equivalent of 90 hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. Specific course requirements are established by the student’s program adviser and are clearly stated on the student’s program of study, which shall be filed in the Office of Records and Registration no later than the end of the student’s first year of study (or after the student has completed 12 hours of course work).

Candidacy

The designation “doctoral candidate” refers to a student who has completed all designated course work and has passed a qualifying examination.

Qualifying Examination

Policies and procedures for the qualifying examination vary from one doctoral program to another (see department handbook). All such policies and procedures, and all subsequent changes made to them, must be recommended by the doctoral program director and approved by the department head and Graduate School.

Dissertation Committee

The task of the dissertation committee is to support the candidate throughout the dissertation process and to provide both formative and summative evaluation. If the dissertation proposal is a part of the qualifying exam, then the dissertation committee will be selected prior to the exam. If the exam is not related to the dissertation, the committee is selected after candidacy is reached. The student will select a committee chair by mutual agreement and on the basis of shared research interests. A committee chair must be tenured or tenure-track, full-time faculty with a completed doctorate. Together, the student and chair then select with their consent from three to five additional members (normally faculty from within the degree-granting department). Dissertation committees must have at least four members (including the chair) and no more than six members. At least half of the committee members must be from the student’s home department. At least one member must be from outside the student’s home department and will serve the committee as the Graduate School representative. One committee member may be from outside the pool of graduate faculty (e.g., faculty from other institutions, alumni, community members, corporate partners, internship supervisor, emeritus faculty). All committee members should be experts in at least some aspect of the student’s dissertation topic area. The final committee roster, and any subsequent changes in committee membership, must be formally approved by the committee chair, department head and Graduate School. Substantive committee decisions and votes to approve the defense and the dissertation require a consensus of all members.

A manual with guidelines and requirements for the dissertation is available from the Graduate School’s website. Deadline dates for submission of the dissertation to the Graduate School are November 1 for December graduation, March 1 for April graduation, May 15 for June graduation and July 1 for August graduation.

Specialist’s Degree

Requirements for admission to a specialist’s degree program include the following:

  1. Submission of the completed Application for Graduate Admission, nonrefundable application fee and all official graduate and undergraduate transcripts to the Office of Admissions;

  2. The earned equivalent of a four-year, U.S. bachelor’s degree (and master’s degree, if applicable) from an accredited college or university;

  3. A minimum cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in the master’s degree or, for those departments admitting directly from the bachelor’s degree, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants who do not meet minimum admission requirements may be considered for conditional admission (see below). Some departments require higher minimum GPAs; see specific program requirements;

  4. Other departmental admission requirements, such as standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, personal statements, portfolios and interviews, as listed under the individual programs;

  5. A statement of financial responsibility for those who are or will be on an F-1 or J-1 visa; and

  6. Demonstration of English language proficiency, by applicants whose native language is not English (see International Applicants, below).

The application and all supporting documents become the property of Eastern Michigan University and will not be returned to the applicant. Applicants are not admitted to the Graduate School and/or an academic program until they have been notified in writing of acceptance by the Office of Admissions.

Master’s Degree

Requirements for admission to a master’s degree program include the following:

  1. Submission of the completed Application for Graduate Admission, nonrefundable application fee and all official undergraduate and graduate transcripts to the Office of Admissions;

  2. The earned equivalent of a four-year U.S. bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university;

  3. A minimum cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 on a 4.0 scale, or 3.0 in the last half of the undergraduate program. Applicants who do not meet minimum admission requirements may be considered for conditional admission (see below). Some departments require higher minimum GPAs; see specific program requirements;

  4. Other departmental admission requirements, such as standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, personal statements, portfolios and interviews, as listed under the individual programs;

  5. A statement of financial responsibility for those who are or will be on an F-1 or J-1 visa; and

  6. Demonstration of English language proficiency, by applicants whose native language is not English (see International Applicants, below).

The application and all supporting documents become the property of Eastern Michigan University and will not be returned to the applicant. Applicants are not admitted to the Graduate School and/or an academic program until they have been notified in writing of acceptance by the Office of Admissions.

Thesis

A number of departments offer the writing of a thesis, either as an option or as a requirement. A manual with guidelines and requirements for the master’s thesis is available from the Graduate School’s web site. A maximum of six thesis hours may be used on a degree program. Deadlines for thesis submission to the Graduate School are November 15 for December graduation; March 15 for April graduation; and July 15 for summer graduation.

Types of Admission

Degree admission requires that the applicant meet both Graduate School and departmental admission requirements as stated in the Graduate Catalog. Admission to graduate studies may be unconditional or conditional. There are four categories of conditional admission:

Conditional Admission

Condition 1: Curriculum Deficiencies. This conditional admission status applies to applicants who meet the Graduate School’s admission requirements, but have curricular deficiencies or do not meet other departmental standards. Conditions to be met prior to gaining degree admission status are normally found on the Graduate Admissions Recommendation Form, sent to the student with the letter of admission.

Condition 2: Senior Status. This status applies to applicants who are in the process of  completing an undergraduate degree at the time of application.   A conditional senior is a student who will have COMPLETED his/her UG degree PRIOR TO the start of the GRADUATE program.  This admission is valid for one semester only, and the condition is removed upon submission of an official degree-posted transcript to the  Office of Admissions . A hold on the student account prevents future course enrollment until degree verification is completed.

Condition 3: English as a Second Language (ESL). ESL status applies to applicants who are non-native speakers of English and whose scores on required language-proficiency tests were below the required minimum. Students admitted with the ESL condition must successfully complete ESL courses as assigned.

Condition 4: Academic Deficiencies. This status is granted to degree program applicants who do not meet the minimum undergraduate GPA requirement of the Graduate School or the academic department, whichever is higher. Students must complete a minimum of nine to twelve graduate hours as specified by the department while maintaining good academic standing (3.0 GPA). These credits can be applied to a graduate degree program only upon the recommendation of the designated departmental advisor. Students are eligible to receive graduate level financial aid for 12 months (three semesters). After 12 months, the Condition 4 status must be removed for continued aid eligibility.

Master’s Degree in Individualized Studies

Advisor:
Jeffrey D Kentor
Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies & Research
200 Boone Hall
(734) 487-0042
jkentor@emich.edu

This 36-hour program provides a flexible and innovative graduate-level experience for students whose educational or professional goals are not met by other graduate degree programs at Eastern Michigan University.

With the assistance of two or more faculty members, applicants propose a program of study made up of a structured sequence of courses designed to meet a specific set of goals and objectives. Courses are taken from three (3) subject areas, and a thesis or capstone project completes the program of study. Interested applicants must meet with the Graduate School.

Certificate Programs

The graduate certificate program is for students with a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and an interest in specialized studies. The advanced graduate certificate is for students with graduate degrees, who wish to stay current in their field or gain expertise in a specialized area.

Requirements for admission to a graduate certificate or advanced graduate certificate program include the following:

  1. Submission of the completed Application for Graduate Admission, non-refundable application fee and all official undergraduate and graduate transcripts to the Office of Admissions;

  2. The earned equivalent of a four-year U.S. bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university;

  3. A minimum cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 on a 4.0 scale, or 3.0 in the last half of the undergraduate program;

  4. Other departmental admission requirements, such as standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, personal statements, portfolios and interviews, listed under the individual programs in this catalog;

  5. A statement of financial responsibility for those who are or will be on an F-1 or J-1 visa; and

  6. Demonstration of English language proficiency, by applicants whose native language is not English (see International Applicants, below).

The application and all supporting documents become the property of Eastern Michigan University and will not be returned to the applicant. Applicants are not admitted to the Graduate School and/or an academic program until they have been notified in writing of acceptance by the Office of Admissions.

Types of Admission

Certificate admission requires that the applicant meet both Graduate School and departmental admission requirements as stated in the Graduate Catalog. Admission to a graduate certificate or advanced graduate certificate program may be unconditional or conditional. There are four categories of conditional admission.

Condition 1: Curriculum deficiencies. This conditional admission status applies to applicants who meet the Graduate School’s admission requirements, but have curricular deficiencies or do not meet other departmental standards. Conditions to be met prior to gaining certificate admission status are normally found on the Graduate Admissions Recommendation Form, sent to the student with the letter of admission.

Condition 2: Senior Status. This status applies to applicants completing an undergraduate degree at the time of application. It is valid for one semester only, and is removed upon submission of an official degree-posted transcript to the Office of Admissions.

Condition 3: English as a Second Language (ESL). ESL status applies to applicants who are non-native speakers of English and whose scores on required language-proficiency tests were below the required minimum. Students admitted with the ESL condition must successfully complete ESL courses as assigned.

Condition 4: Academic Deficiencies. This status is granted to certificate program applicants who do not meet the minimum undergraduate GPA requirement of the Graduate School or the academic department, whichever is higher. Students must complete a minimum of 6 graduate hours as specified by the department while maintaining a good academic standing (3.0 GPA). These credits can be applied to a graduate certificate program only upon the recommendation of the designated departmental advisor. Students are eligible to receive graduate level financial aid for 12 months (three semesters). After 12 months, the Condition 4 status must be removed for continued aid eligibility.

Certificate Requirements

Both graduate and advanced graduate certificate programs must consist of at least 12 graduate-level hours. One 400-level course may be used on the graduate certificate program. No 400-level courses may be used on the advanced graduate certificate. A minimum GPA of 3.0 must be achieved. In most cases, credits earned for certificate programs may apply to a graduate degree. All requirements for either certificate must be completed within three years of first enrollment.

Non-Degree Admission

Non-degree admission status applies to students who do not wish to pursue a degree program, or who are prevented from doing so by the Graduate School or their academic department. Non-degree status may be appropriate in the following situations:

  1. Professional Teacher Certification. Certified teachers and other education professionals who do not intend to pursue a graduate-degree program enroll in this category. Applicants are seeking a second teaching certificate (see Teacher Certificate section of this catalog).*

  2. Extended Programs and Educational Outreach. Applicants who enroll through Extended Programs and Educational Outreach are non-degree students. Students seeking a degree must formally apply and be admitted to a graduate program, and any courses taken through Extended Programs and Educational Outreach must be approved by the academic department and the Graduate School as noted on a program of study.

  3. Graduate Non-degree: This status is intended for applicants with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.7 who wish to enroll in graduate or undergraduate courses for self-enrichment purposes or to obtain other professional qualifications such as teaching endorsements. This admission status does not lead to a graduate degree. Applicants must provide a bachelor’s degree-posted transcript with at least 60 hours of course work and a 2.7 GPA. If 60 hours were not earned from the bachelor’s-degree-granting institution, all undergraduate transcripts must be provided to the Office of Admissions.

  4. Undergraduate Non-degree: An applicant whose undergraduate grade point average was 2.0 to 2.7 may be admitted as an undergraduate student to enroll in undergraduate courses for which course prerequisites have been met. An Undergraduate Admission Application must be completed and submitted with fee to the Office of Admissions. See the Undergraduate Catalog for further details.

Note:

*Applicants seeking their first (provisional) teaching certificate will apply as undergraduate post-baccalaureate teacher certificate students. See the EMU Undergraduate Catalog for details.

Second Bachelor’s Degree

Second bachelor’s degree students are admitted as undergraduate students using the undergraduate admissions form. See the Undergraduate Catalog for details.

Guest Students

The Michigan Intercollegiate Graduate Studies (MIGS) program offers graduate students at many Michigan institutions the opportunity to take advantage of graduate courses or experiences offered by Eastern Michigan University or other institutions in the state. Applicants complete the MIGS application form (available in the Graduate School, and on the Graduate School’s website) and secure the approval of their adviser for the courses to be taken.

Currently enrolled students in a graduate program at other institutions who wish to take a graduate course at Eastern Michigan University for transfer to their home institution may do so by enrolling as non-degree students. Guest students in the College of Business must meet the standards for regular admission to business programs.

International Applicants

An applicant is considered an international student if either of the following conditions exists:

  1. the applicant is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, or

  2. the applicant currently has or will require a visa to live, work or study in the United States.

Priority deadlines for receipt of all application materials for graduate degree and certificate programs are:

 

Semester/Session
Fall
Winter
Summer

 

Deadline
Feb. 15
Oct. 1
April 1

English as a Second Language


English as a Second Language (ESL) courses are taught in the Department of World Languages. These courses carry academic credit and are calculated in the total GPA.

Admission status is based on the first English proficiency score that students send to the University. If a later test results in a higher score, it also should be sent to the Admissions Office. All scores must arrive two weeks before the first day of the term or semester.

Students will be given ESL conditional admission if they are admitted to the University, but score below the minimum scores required below:

 

Graduate TOEFL (PBT)
Graduate TOEFL (iBT)
Graduate MELAB
Graduate IELTS
Graduate PTE**

 

550
79
77
6.5
58

* Some graduate programs require higher scores. Check with the program department or school.
** The Pearson Test of English is an option for language competency for graduate admission. It may be used instead of score submission from TOEFL, IELTS or MELAB.

Intensive English Program (IEP)
International students who wish to improve their English before applying to a degree program may apply to the Intensive English Program in the Dept. of World Languages.  The IEP offers full-time, rigorous ESL instruction for academic purposes.  For more information, see http://www.emich.edu/worldlanguages/esl/.

Students under ESL conditional admission must take ESL classes in the first semester in which they are enrolled. Placement into ESL classes will be determined by the sub-scores achieved on the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, or PTE. (Contact the ESL Office for more information.)

Once placed into ESL courses students must complete each course with a grade of C or higher to advance to the next level. (Students who receive a grade of C- or lower for a course must repeat that course in the next semester in which they are enrolled.) Graduate students must continue ESL courses each semester until they finish the 500 level.

When students are at the 400 or 500 level of ESL, they may take other courses in the University at the same time.

When students have successfully completed the required ESL courses, their admission status is changed from conditional to regular.

Regular University academic probation and dismissal policies apply to students in ESL courses.

For information on the TOEFL or TWE, contact:

Educational Testing Service
P.O. Box 6155
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6155
Phone: 609.771.7100
Web site: http://www.ets.org/toefl

For information on the MELAB, contact:

English Language Institute
University of Michigan
3020 NUBS
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Phone: 734.764.2416

Academics

Registration and Grading


Registration

Students may not attend classes unless they are properly registered and have paid appropriate fees.

Students who have not enrolled for eight consecutive semesters (two years) must complete an Enrollment Change form from the Office of Admissions before registering. For some programs, departmental evaluation for readmission will be required.

Students who do not enroll during the semester in which they are admitted must update their admission by submitting an Enrollment Change form to the Office of Admissions before registration is permitted.

Orientation

Orientations, scheduled at the beginning of new semesters, provide an overview of academic and campus life to new students. The graduate student and graduate assistant orientations cover such topics as Graduate School policies, ID cards, parking passes, e-mail accounts, financial aid, campus employment or assistantships, Career Services, public safety, library services, University computing, campus life, student health services, student affairs and international student information. They provide not only answers to your questions about the graduate experience, but also a place to get to know fellow students. Students are encouraged to attend.

For more information on orientations, visit the Graduate School website.

Program of Study

A program of study, which is the list of courses you will take to complete your degree, is required for students in all degree and certificate programs. Students who fail to obtain a program of study approved by their adviser assume full responsibility for their registrations and for satisfying University, Graduate School and departmental program requirements. An approved program of study must be on file in the Office of Records and Registration, 303 Pierce Hall, in order to meet graduation requirements. Students should schedule an appointment with their academic/graduate adviser to set up a program of study as soon as possible within their first semester.

Undergraduate 400-Level Courses for Graduate Credit

Some 400-level undergraduate courses are available for graduate credit. Students taking these courses are required to perform additional graduate-level work. Request forms are available in the Office of Records and Registration or the Graduate School and on their web sites. The form must be approved by the instructor and the student’s adviser and then returned to the Graduate School at the beginning of the semester or term.

No more than nine hours of 400-level course work may be applied toward a graduate program. Such courses must appear on the student’s program of study to be applied toward a degree.

Independent study or special topics courses at the 400-level will not receive graduate credit. Students must use a 500-level independent study or special topics number.

Enrollment in Graduate Courses by Advanced Undergraduates

An undergraduate student may enroll in 500-level courses with instructor/department and Graduate School approval if A) the student has completed 85 or more hours with a minimum GPA of 2.7, or B) if the student is a member in good standing of the Honors College, has completed 70 or more hours, and has written permission from the Honors Director. No more than 15 graduate hours may be taken by an undergraduate student.

Auditing Courses

Graduate students who wish to audit a course must register for audit status and pay the same tuition and fees as for academic credit enrollment. See the class schedule book for audit deadlines.

Pass/Fail Grading Option

Graduate students may elect a pass/fail grading option when enrolling in undergraduate courses for enrichment that will not apply to a graduate program of study. Undergraduate curriculum deficiency requirements noted on a program of study may not be completed with a pass grade, unless approved by a graduate adviser.

Students should enroll in the course, then complete the Pass/Fail Application Form for Graduate Students submitting it to the Graduate School before the end of the first week of the semester. The form may be obtained from the Office of Records and Registration, or from the Graduate School or its web site. Students complete all course work and the faculty member submits a letter grade at the end of the semester to the Office of Records and Registration. The grade is converted to pass/fail. A student may cancel the pass/fail grading option at any time before the last day of classes for the semester just prior to exams, and the letter grade submitted by the faculty will post to the student’s transcript.

Independent Study


Independent study enables graduate students to pursue academic interests not addressed in conventional courses. A maximum of six hours of independent study may be used on a degree program. See the section on Course Limitations below.

Course Limitations

No more than six hours in one of the following categories may be used to satisfy graduate degree requirements:

Special Topics: 590, 591, 592, 679, 680, 681
Independent Study: 597, 598, 599, 697, 698, 699
Seminar: 693, 694, 695, 696
Workshop: 594, 595, 596, 682, 683, 684, 685
Thesis/Final Project: 690, 691, 692, 790, 791, 792

A graduate program of study may not include more than 12 hours of special topics, independent study, seminar and workshop courses, in combination, and no more than nine hours of 400-level courses.

Attendance


Students who find it necessary to be absent from classes in order to observe major religious holidays may arrange with their instructors to make up missed work, including examinations. If satisfactory arrangements cannot be made with the instructor, students may appeal to the department head.

Expectations regarding class attendance should be included in the printed syllabus distributed by the instructor at the beginning of the semester.

Withdrawal


Graduate students are expected to follow University policy and procedures for withdrawal, both from individual classes and from the University. Nonattendance and/or nonpayment of tuition do not constitute withdrawal or absolve a student of academic or financial responsibility.

Withdrawal from Individual Classes - Fall/Winter Semesters
  1. First Eight Days. Any change in the student’s program occurring during this period may be processed through the registration system. Such changes are not recorded on the student’s permanent record.

  2. Ninth Day Through Tenth Week. All student-initiated withdrawals are accepted automatically and recorded as W. Withdrawals initiated during this period will not result in tuition adjustment or reimbursement.

  3. After the Tenth Week, Until the Beginning of the Final Exam Period. Students must initiate a withdrawal request at the Graduate School. A W may be granted only if the student shows documentation for inability to complete the course (e.g., illness, family concerns, employment problems). Poor academic performance is not a valid reason for withdrawal and such requests will be denied.

Students considering withdrawal should consult with their instructor(s) and should not stop attending class before receiving official notification that their withdrawal has been approved. If a student stops attending class without officially withdrawing and does not take the final examination, University policy requires that the instructor assign a grade of F for the course. Students who believe they have received an unearned F grade and who wish to appeal must do so during the following semester; no later appeals will be heard.

International students holding F-1 or J-1 visas must also seek withdrawal approval from the Office of International Students. Students who are on financial aid or who hold scholarships, fellowships or graduate assistantships should consult the Graduate School before withdrawing from courses in order to fully understand the potential financial impact.

Policies governing the refund of tuition and fees are to be found in the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog. The class schedule book should be consulted for the calendar regulating withdrawals.

Withdrawal from All Classes

Students may withdraw from all classes (withdraw from the University) before the first day of exams and receive a grade of W for all courses. This transaction is handled by the Office of Records and Registration. Such withdrawal may necessitate the updating of a student’s admission status, and students in their first semester must notify their academic department and the Office of Admissions before re-enrolling.

Continuous Enrollment


Once degree-requirement enrollment is complete, graduate students may elect continuous enrollment in either course number 639 for master’s/specialist-level students or 767 for doctoral students. The one-credit enrollment will not apply toward degree completion, nor will there be assignments or a grade, but enrollment will assist in several ways, including:

  1. enabling access to University services such as the library as thesis/dissertation or final projects are being completed;

  2. delaying loan repayment while completing thesis, dissertation, or final project;

  3. providing liability coverage during internship or field placement. Some graduate programs, such as the doctoral program in Educational Leadership, may require continuous enrollment. Students may repeat enrollment as often as needed.

Course Numbering System


  • 400-500: for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Graduate students must obtain Graduate School approval before enrolling in 400-level courses. To earn graduate credit for a 400-level course, the student must do work at the graduate level. The 500-level courses are open to advanced undergraduates; see Enrollment in Graduate Courses by Advanced Undergraduates.

  • 600: for graduate students only.

  • 700 and above: for advanced-level graduate degree students.

Grading System

         

Grade points

Grade   Significance  

per credit hour

 

A

  Exceptionally high order  

4.0

 

A-

     

3.7

 

B+

     

3.3

 

B

  Distinctly above the average  

3.0

 

B-

     

2.7

 

C+

     

2.3

 

C

  Average  

2.0

 

C-

     

1.7

 

F

  Unsatisfactory (denoting failure)  

0.0

Note: Graduate students who earn a D grade will have an F grade posted on their transcript. Grades below a C- are considered a failure.

Student academic records are kept on permanent file in the Office of Records and Registration. Transcripts may be ordered through the Cashier’s Office, or on-line at getmytranscript.com.

Credit/No Credit

The Graduate School awards credit/no credit only for theses, practicums, selected fieldwork, selected independent-study courses and special cases such as exhibitions in art. It is not a student’s prerogative to elect a course for credit/no credit; only previously designated courses are available for such credit. To receive credit for a credit/no credit course, a student must perform in a manner equivalent to B work in the judgment of the faculty supervising the student’s work.

Repeating Courses


Students who meet the prerequisites and all other conditions for enrollment may repeat a course one time. A course may be repeated if the first grade is a B- or lower. The second grade will calculate into the grade point average. All grades earned will be retained on the student’s permanent record, with repeats indicated. Courses are dropped or from which a student has withdrawn are not counted as attempted repeats for the purpose of this policy. Credit and grade point calculations for repeated courses are determined by the following rules:

Credit Earned:

  1. Unless otherwise noted in the course description, credit for any repeated course (including all attempts at EMU and transfer credit granted) will apply only once toward all degree requirements.

  2. The rules below do not apply to courses (such as Independent Studies) that can be taken for credit more than once. Multiple attempts in such courses are not considered repeats, and all grades received will be used in determining the student’s grade point average. 

  3. A student who earned a passing grade in a course or who has previously received transfer credit for the course will lose the credit if he or she subsequently retakes the course and receives an F. If a student receives an Incomplete in the final attempt of a repeated course, the most recent earlier grade is the grade of record until the course work is completed and the I is replaced by the grade earned.

Repeated Courses and Grade Point Average (GPA):

  1. Courses that are dropped or from which a student has withdrawn are not counted as attempts for purposes of this policy.

  2. A course may be repeated once and only the last grade received will be used in determining the student’s grade point average. As stated above, all course attempts with repeats indicated will remain on the permanent record, even if not used to determine the grade point average.

I (Incomplete) Grades


An I grade may be awarded when illness or other unavoidable extenuating circumstances prevent completion of a course, provided that academic performance for the completed portion of the course (50% or more) merits a grade of B or better. The instructor will provide the student and the department head with a rationale for the I grade and will specify the work required to remove the incomplete.

Unless an extension is granted, an I grade must be removed within 12 months. The 12-month limit may be extended only under unusual circumstances upon the written recommendation of the instructor and with the approval of the Graduate School. The initiative for conversion of an I to a letter grade rests with the student. No extensions will be granted after three years, after which time the I becomes a permanent part of the student’s academic record.

Incompletes received in thesis, dissertation or capstone courses are not governed by these regulations.

Grade Changes


When a letter grade (excluding I for incomplete grade or IP for in progress grade) is posted to a student’s permanent record (either electronic or hard copy), it will be considered final unless an error was made in assigning the grade. Permitting a student to submit missing work or extra credit to improve a grade after the grade has been posted is not acceptable.

If an instructor error is identified, the instructor must file a grade change form, explaining the error. This form requires the approval of the department head. The appropriate dean will review and approve grade changes to ensure consistency with academic policies. All changes in letter grades (except from an I or IP grade) will require the signature of the dean of the college. The grade change will then be submitted to and processed by personnel in the Office of Records and Registration. One year after the end of the relevant semester all grade changes from I or IP will require the permission of the Graduate School.

It is the responsibility of the student to call the instructor’s attention to a possible grading error in a timely manner, but not more than 12 months after the questionable grade is posted. Three years following the close of any term of enrollment, the student’s transcript will be considered to be the final indisputable record of academic achievement. Specifically, at the end of three years, grades are considered final, and no changes will be made to transcripts (e.g., no term or individual withdrawals, no grade omissions, no recalculated grades based on mathematical or clerical error, no incomplete removals). This rule does not apply to master’s specialist and doctoral field-based research, internships, thesis and dissertation hours.

Point of Clairfication: The last pharagraph should read, “It is the responsibility of the student to call the instructor’s attention to a possible grading error in a timely manner, but not more than 12 months after the questionable grade is posted. Three years following the close of any term of enrollment, or at the time of the student’s graduation (whichever is first), the student’s transcript will be considered to be the final indisputable record of academic achievement. Specifically, at the end of three years, grades are considered final, and no changes will be made to transcripts (e.g., no term or individual withdrawals, no grade omissions, no recalculated grades based on mathematical or clerical error, no incomplete removals). This rule does not apply to graduate courses with the words “research”, “internship”, “thesis” or “dissertation” in the title.” and will be written as such in future graduate catalogs.

Academic Load


Eight hours of graduate credit for the semester is the standard full-time load. International students enrolled in less than eight credit hours fall and winter semesters must have a Reduced Load form processed through the Office of International Students. This may be used only once during a graduate program unless the student is a graduate assistant.

Graduate students may not enroll in more than 15 hours for fall or winter, or nine hours for summer without prior permission from the Graduate School. Students should complete a petition co-signed by their faculty advisers. If students seeking professional teaching certificates or additional endorsements need to take more than the maximum allowable number of credit hours, they may do so by contacting the Office of Records and Registration, 303 Pierce Hall.

Students with fall and/or winter graduate assistantships must enroll in at least six graduate hours per semester. During summer session, graduate assistants must enroll in at least one hour during the term (s) of employment.

By federal regulation, students must be enrolled in four hours per semester to be considered half-time. For Title IV programs, veterans’ benefits, and loan deferments, the following requirements must be met:

 
  • maximum load: 15 hours per semester
  • full-time student: 8 hours per semester
  • half-time student: 4 hours per semester

A doctoral student at the end of the program may submit to the Graduate School a Low Enrollment form to be classified as a full-time student when enrolled in fewer than four credits for loan deferment, SEVIS requirements, liability coverage, and access to library and campus services.

Residency Requirement


Although the Graduate School does not require a specific period of campus residency, it nevertheless supports the efforts of graduate programs to create a cohesive intellectual community.

Note, however, that some EMU graduate programs do enforce a residency requirement even if the Graduate School does not. Students should check with their advisers and program descriptions to determine specific expectations and requirements. These may vary from one program to the next and may include attendance at guest lectures or conferences, or even specific periods of enrollment on the main campus.

Time Limitations


Students have seven years to complete the requirements for the doctoral degree from the date of first enrollment at EMU (see the section on doctoral programs). Specialist’s degree requirements must be completed within six years by those entering with master’s degrees or eight years by those entering with bachelor’s degrees. Master’s degree requirements must be completed within six years of first enrollment. Graduate and advanced graduate certificate requirements must be completed within three years of first enrollment.

Validation of Credit


Credit that is older than six years but less than 10 years old may be counted toward graduation requirements only if it is validated by the student’s department/school. Students may validate up to nine hours of out-of-date credit for use on a degree program by taking an examination covering course content. Such validation is contingent on relevant program requirements, adviser recommendation and Graduate School approval. Forms to request such credit by examination are available in the Office of Records and Registration and the Graduate School or on its website, and such requests must be approved by the instructor, department head and adviser before making payment of the fee in the Cashier’s Office. Complete requirements are listed on the back of the form.

Files of enrolled students are retained for seven years from the time of last attendance. After that time, only the Eastern Michigan University transcript (permanent record card) is retained. Course work taken during and after winter 1995 is kept in electronic format only.

Transfer of Credit to Degree Programs


Applicable graduate course credit may be accepted from other accredited graduate institutions to be included on a graduate degree program. The allowable maximum for transfer credit to a specialist’s degree is six hours; 12 hours toward a master’s degree; and three hours for a graduate or advanced graduate certificate. For master of fine arts and doctoral programs, transfer credit will be determined by the department, subject to the approval of the department head and the Graduate School. Transfer credit must:

  1. be applicable to the degree program;

  2. have a grade of B or higher (grades of “pass,” “satisfactory,” or “credit” cannot be transferred);

  3. not be out-of-date per the degree time limitation;

  4. be recommended by the adviser and approved by the Graduate School;

  5. be documented as graduate credit on an official graduate transcript from an accredited institution.

Some departments have a more restrictive transfer-credit policy; refer to program information in this catalog for details.

Up to six hours of appropriate credit from a previous master’s degree may be applied to a new degree if the new degree is in a discipline different from the previous master’s degree.

Transfer credit is evaluated prior to the graduation degree audit. Official transcripts for courses planned to be transferred to Eastern Michigan University should be on file in the Office of Records and Registration at least one month prior to the end of the semester in which the student plans to graduate. Such credits are recorded on the student’s record at the time of approval.

Credit earned while on non-degree status does not automatically apply to a degree program. Acceptance depends upon admission to a degree program and the recommendation of the adviser. Courses are listed on the program of study. Students must complete a minimum of 10 hours after admission to the degree program from which they intend to graduate.

Transfer credit request forms are available in the Office of Records and Registration and the Graduate School or on its website.

Academic Probation and Dismissal


Students are placed on academic probation at the end of any semester in which their cumulative EMU grade point average in courses taken for graduate credit is below 3.0. Students must complete six graduate hours at EMU before being subject to academic probation. Students are notified in writing each semester of their status, and enrollment is permitted only on a semester-by-semester basis until the probation is removed. Probationary students who do not return to good standing by the end of the next two enrollment periods (summer sessions equal one enrollment period) are dismissed from the University and are so notified in writing.

Students whose cumulative honor points are 15 or more below those required for a B in all completed graduate-level courses are subject to dismissal at any time. For instance, a student with 20 completed graduate hours must have 60 honor points to maintain a B; if the student has less than 45 honor points, the student is subject to dismissal.

Dismissal Appeals Process

After dismissal, students may appeal to the Graduate School for readmission by submitting a letter to the dean’s office. This letter should state the cause(s) of the student’s academic problems, changes in the student’s situation that may rectify those problems and a proposed plan of action to ensure success in graduate studies.

Upon receipt of the letter, the Graduate School will initiate the appeals process with the Academic Dismissal Appeals Board of the Graduate Council. A review by the board may not be considered for dismissed students whose GPA is less than 2.0 unless extreme circumstances can be documented.

The Graduate School will notify the chair of the Academic Dismissal Appeals Board and a hearing will be held within 30 days of receipt of the student’s letter. The appeals hearing will adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. A detailed record shall be kept of the hearing, preferably a tape recording;

  2. The student is allowed an adviser who will be a member of the University community (faculty, full-time staff or student).

  3. The hearing shall be open unless the student requests a closed hearing;

  4. The student may call witnesses and Board members may question them;

  5. All deliberations of the Board will be in executive session.

The Academic Dismissal Appeals Board consists of a chair and four members, who are selected by the Graduate School. All Board members are also members of the Graduate Council; two Board members are faculty; and two are student members of the Graduate Council. The chair does not have voting rights except in the case of a split decision.

An additional appeal will be considered only if new evidence is presented.

Final Project/Graduation


Final Project/Experience

Each graduate program has a different culminating or capstone experience required for graduation. Some require a thesis or dissertation; others require a special project or internship; while others require students to pass a final exam. Your graduate adviser will explain what you need to do to finish your program. See the Graduate School website for the Thesis and Dissertation Manuals, all forms, and information about research and human subject approval.

Graduate Research Fair

Once nearing completion of a culminating or capstone experience, students are highly encouraged to share outcomes or findings with others on campus. The Graduate School and the Division of Academic and Student Affairs annually sponsor a Graduate Research Fair in March to highlight student work. Many students use this forum to practice their oral or poster presentation skills before presenting at local, state or national conferences. It’s very exciting to see the variety and breadth of work completed by EMU graduate students. Nomination forms to participate in the event are due to department heads in January. Students graduating in December are encouraged to return and share their research along with those who anticipate program completion in April, June or August.

Graduation Requirements

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all requirements for graduation have been met. Candidates for graduation must submit an application, available in the Office of Records and Registration, the Graduate School or in the class schedule book, on or before the deadlines listed in the class schedule book each semester. Deadlines are generally within the first two weeks of the semester (earlier in summer sessions). A non-refundable fee ($90) is due with the application and must be submitted to the Cashier’s Office. Students who file for graduation but fail to complete their degree requirements in a timely manner, must notify the Office of Records and Registration in writing and submit a new graduation application for a subsequent semester (no additional fee is required).

Failure to apply for graduation will result in a delay in graduation date (receipt of the degree).

Students should expect to receive their degree-verification letter within three to four weeks after the close of the semester in which their degree is conferred. Diplomas and a transcript are mailed approximately eight to 10 weeks after the close of the semester in which the degree is conferred.

Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all graduate-level courses taken at EMU and in their program of study to remain in good academic standing and be eligible for graduation. Students do not need to be registered for classes during the semester of graduation.

Commencement

Once an application for graduation has been processed, the Office of Records and Registration will send information about commencement tickets, event logistics and details for ordering cap and gown. If course work is finished during the summer terms, one’s name will appear in the December commencement program and one may return to participate in the event. Students may request to participate in the April ceremony only if they have six or fewer hours to be completed in summer (including any I grades). If permission is granted, the Office of Records and Registration will send commencement information. Names will not be in the program but students can walk across the stage and celebrate with family and friends.

Done with one graduate program, on to another one? Many EMU graduate students return to complete a second master’s degree, a graduate certificate program, a specialist degree program or a doctoral program. Once a degree is conferred, the student number becomes inactive. A new admissions application, another fee, a new personal statement and any other admission materials the new program may require must be submitted to the Office of Admissions. Once an application has been reviewed by the new department and has been processed by the Office of Admissions, the old student number will be activated and course registration begins the cycle anew.

See the Graduate School website for other helpful links. 

Financial Assistance

Various types of financial aid are available to graduate students, including assistantships, fellowships, scholarships, work-study jobs, and loans. Some of these programs are administered by the Office of Financial Aid and others by the Graduate School.

Graduate Assistantships


Graduate assistantships are administered by the Graduate School. Assistantships are very competitive. They provide both financial support (tuition scholarships and stipend) and experiential learning for degree-admitted students. Graduate assistantships are normally available for up to two years (four enrollment periods), subject to the recommendation of an academic department and approval by the Graduate School. Graduate assistants (G.A.’s) must maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA and make satisfactory progress toward degree completion.

Three categories of assistantship are available: departmental (appointed by an academic department); underrepresented populations (approved by the Graduate School); and need-based work-study (approved by the Graduate School and the Office of Financial Aid). International students are eligible only for departmental G.A. positions.

To be eligible, applicants must:

  1. Be fully or conditionally admitted (conditions 1, 2 or 3) to an academic degree program;

  2. Have achieved a cumulative undergraduate GPA equal to the average of students already admitted to the college’s degree programs (usually 3.0);

  3. (U.S. citizens only) Complete the required financial aid forms, including the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), through the Office of Financial Aid. The FAFSA must be submitted by February 15 for consideration for the following fall semester. Receipt of a graduate assistantship will affect other financial aid awards.

Full-time graduate assistantships provide the following benefits:

  1. Up to 18 credit hours of tuition per fiscal year. (Tuition benefits are prorated for part-time assistantships and for G.A.’s beginning their appointments after the start of the semester);

  2. Payment of the registration, general University, technology and student union fees;

  3. Parking permit for selected lots, library privileges and a 10 percent discount on purchases at the University bookstore;

  4. Variable stipends based on department/school of hire; see Graduate School web site;

  5. Valuable experiential learning opportunities.

Students should contact their academic department/school for information on G.A. positions. The Graduate School can provide more information on the G.A. program and provide copies of the policies governing the program. The information is also online.

G.A. positions may be offered to international students holding F-1 or J-1 visas or other visa-type holders with valid work permits.

Applications are available in the Graduate School or on its website.

University Fellowships


Fellowships are a distinction of honor awarded to select graduate students on the basis of academic merit. The fellowship ranges from $500-$4,000. Fellows receiving $3,000 or more must enroll for at least eight graduate credits per semester; fellows receiving $2,000 or less must enroll for at least four graduate credits per semester.

To be considered for a graduate fellowship, new graduate students must present a minimum 3.6 cumulative undergraduate GPA; current graduate students must present a minimum 3.6 cumulative graduate GPA.

Graduate fellows (1) must hold degree admission to an academic program leading to a master’s, master of fine arts, or specialist’s degree; (2) must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.6 while holding the fellowship; (3) may apply for one additional academic year if they continue to achieve a 3.6 cumulative graduate GPA.

Applications are available in the Graduate School or on its website.

Need-Based Aid


Application

To apply for need-based aid, graduate students must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Based on information reported on the FAFSA, the federal government calculates the Expected Family Contribution (a number that equates to the student’s ability to pay for college). The Expected Family Contribution is subtracted from EMU’s cost of education. Need is the difference between the student’s ability to pay and the cost of education.

The FAFSA should be filed in January of each year, prior to fall enrollment. Graduate students who are admitted to a graduate degree program will be notified of their eligibility for financial aid once EMU receives their application results from the FAFSA processor. Need-based aid is automatically awarded for fall and winter semesters. Students who need financial aid for summer sessions must file an additional application, available in the Office of Financial Aid or on  its web site beginning February 15 each year.

To be eligible for federal and state need-based aid, a student must:

  1. Be accepted by the Graduate School as either a regular or conditionally admitted student in a degree program. Students in this category may borrow up to the cost of their education (not to exceed $18,500) annually, in any combination of subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford Loans.

  2. Maintain a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.0, complete 75 percent of classes attempted, and complete the graduate degree within 150 percent of the program’s published minimum credit hours.

Federal and State Aid

Federal and state work-study is awarded to eligible students who demonstrate need. Students may work up to 20 hours weekly on campus or at participating off-campus agencies during the fall and winter semesters. Hourly wages are set by the employer. Full-time work-study positions are also available for students who wish to earn during the summer sessions, if the students will be enrolled in the following fall semester. A FAFSA for the upcoming year is required along with the full-time College Work Study application available in April each year.

Perkins Loans are need-based, long-term educational loans of up to $6,000 per year. Borrowers must begin repayment nine months after graduating, leaving school or dropping below half-time status. Students have 10 years to repay the loans. Repayment schedules depend on the amount borrowed. Repayment terms may be arranged with the Student Loan Accounting Office before leaving EMU.

Subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford Loans are student loans which carry low fixed interest rates. Graduate students may borrow the cost of education (not to exceed $20,500 annually). The maximum loan amount per semester depends on the cost of attendance and other financial aid. Students may be awarded less than the yearly maximum if they receive other financial assistance that is used to cover a portion of the cost of attendance.

The cumulative loan limit is $138,500 for graduate or professional students (only $65,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans). Interest on the subsidized Stafford Loan does not accrue until the student graduates, leaves school or drops below half-time status. Interest on the unsubsidized Stafford Loan accrues from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. If the student allows the interest to accumulate, it will be capitalized - that is, the interest will be added to the principal amount of the loan and will increase the amount that needs to be repaid.

Work-Study Graduate Assistantships

A limited number of work-study graduate assistantships are funded through the College Work-Study Program. Interested students should contact the Graduate School. Students must submit G.A. application material as well as the FAFSA by February 15 for the following fall semester.

Other Aid


Student employment listings are maintained by the Student Employment Office. No demonstration of financial need is necessary. On-campus employment is limited to 29 hours per week.

Off-campus employment is also listed in the Student Employment Office, as well as with the Job Location and Development Office.

Summer employment opportunities are available with campus, resort, recreational, business, industrial and governmental agencies. Listings for such positions begin during the winter semester in the Student Employment Office.

University Short-Term Loans are available for direct and indirect educational expenses from the Student Loan Accounting Office. An applicant must be enrolled at EMU and have a minimum 3.0 GPA at the time funds are released, have no past-due obligations to EMU, have repaid previous loans satisfactorily and demonstrate sufficient means to repay the loan by the due date.

Employer Tuition Reimbursement Plans are offered by many companies. Graduate students are encouraged to investigate their employer’s policy.

Awards and Scholarships

Guidelines and application forms for the following awards are available in the Graduate School or on its web site:

  1. The Graduate Deans’ Award for Research Excellence is a $250 cash award made in the fall and winter semesters to reward excellence in ongoing or completed research projects.

  2. The Barton Scholarship is a one-time competitive award to EMU graduating seniors of up to $4,000 for graduate study at EMU or UM. Applications are considered for the fall and winter semesters.

  3. The Anton Brenner Scholarship is a one-time award of $500 to be applied to tuition and fees. Applications are considered by the Graduate School for each fall semester.

  4. The Undergraduate Symposium Fellowship is a one-time award of $1,000 to students who participated in the annual Eastern Michigan University Undergraduate Symposium and wish to continue their education as graduate students at EMU. Applications are submitted to the College of Arts and Sciences.

For additional information on scholarships available to graduate students or general financial aid information, contact the Office of Financial Aid or its website: www.emich.edu/finaid/

Tuition/Fees Calculator


Click on this link http://www.emich.edu/sbs/calc.php to use a Tuition/Fees Calculator to estimate your cost of attendance

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees


Fees Subject to Revision

All University fees and assessments are subject to change by action of the Board of Regents. For the most recent tuition information, visit our web site at http://www.emich.edu/sbs/calc.php.

Application Fee

A one-time, non-refundable $30 online or $35 paper application fee is charged to each applicant to the Graduate School. Applications for additional degrees or certificates are subject to additional non-refundable fees.

Graduation Fee

A non-refundable graduation fee of $95 is charged to each student applying for a degree or a graduate or advanced graduate certificate.

Graduation fees for teaching certificates are set by the undergraduate division and appear in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Tuition Schedule


Tuition is assessed for all credit hours for which a student is registered. Undergraduate tuition is assessed for all 100- to 400-level courses. Graduate tuition is assessed for all 500- to 900-level courses.

Tuition rates per credit hour are subject to review at each June Board of Regents meeting and may increase.

2008-2009 Michigan and Ohio resident rates, per credit hour:
Undergraduate courses, up to 499:
Graduate courses, lower level (500-699):
Doctoral assessment, upper level (700-999):
  $229.50
$401.50
$462.00
     
2008-2009 non-resident rates, per credit hour:
Undergraduate courses, up to 499:
Graduate courses, lower level (500-699):
Doctoral assessment, upper level (700-999):
  $676.00
$791.50
$892.00

A non-refundable registration fee of $43 per semester, a general fee of $22.60 per credit hour, a student union fee of $3.25 and a technology fee of $10.75 per credit hour are also assessed. Additional information is available at www.emich.edu. Graduate classes in some programs have an additional per-credit-hour program fee.

Decrease in Academic Load:


For the fall and winter semester, a 100 percent tuition credit, less the $12 program adjustment fee, will be processed for those students who decrease their academic load through the eighth day of classes. For summer sessions, a 100 percent credit adjustment, less the $12 program adjustment fee, will be made during the first four days of classes. Actual dates are printed in the class schedule for each semester and session and also online.

No credit adjustments will be made after the above stipulated dates. If a student feels that individual circumstances warrant exceptions from the credit adjustment or the University withdrawal adjustment policy:

  1. Obtain a Tuition Appeal Application from the Students Business Services Office in 203 Pierce Hall. Complete and return the application along with an explanation of the extraordinary circumstances involved with supporting documentation of those circumstances. An approval or denial will be issued in writing by return mail.

  2. Appeal in writing to the director of Student Business Services at the address above. Be sure to include any additional pertinent information with your written appeal.

Official Registration Day


For purposes of payment of registration fees and tuition assessment, the official registration day for each student is the day the student completes initial registration for the semester or session.

Qualification for Michigan Residence


To be eligible for the resident tuition rate, students must demonstrate that they are already Michigan/Ohio residents or are coming to the University for reasons primarily other than to attend the University. The following policies will be used to determine residency:

  1. Minors: The residence of a student under 18 years of age follows that of the student’s parents or legal guardians. If the parents or legal guardians meet the criteria under f below, Criteria for Determining Intent, the student is considered a resident for tuition purposes.

  2. Non-dependent Students: A student 18 years of age or older must meet the criteria in f below, Criteria for Determining Intent.

  3. Spouse of Eligible Person: The residence of a student otherwise classified as a nonresident for tuition purposes will follow that of the student’s spouse, if the spouse is eligible for classification as a resident for tuition purposes. This applies only to U.S. citizens or to aliens admitted for permanent residence in the United States who have obtained a permanent or diplomatic visa.

  4. Aliens: A noncitizen will be eligible for classification as a resident for tuition purposes only if the student is lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States, has received a permanent or diplomatic visa, and meets the criteria in f below, Criteria for Determining Intent, The University provides two installment payment plans for fall and winter.

  5. Migrants: Michigan migrants will be classified as residents for tuition purposes if they or their parents or legal guardians were employed in Michigan for at least two months during each of three of the preceding five years. Verification of employment as migrant workers should be secured from the Michigan Farm Labor and Rural Manpower Services Office. Other appropriate evidence also may be used by migrant workers to establish their status.

  6. Criteria for Determining Intent: Students from outside the state and to whom the above policies are not applicable shall be considered nonresident for tuition purposes unless it can be determined that their primary purpose in coming to Michigan is to establish residency in the state, rather than to attend a university. For the purpose of determining intent in such cases, the following criteria are considered, no one of which should be considered controlling:

    1. High school attendance in Michigan

    2. Reliance upon Michigan sources for financial support

    3. Residence in Michigan of family, legal guardian, or other relatives or persons legally responsible for the student

    4. Former residence in Michigan and maintenance of significant connections therein while absent

    5. Continuous presence in Michigan during periods when not enrolled as a student

    6. Long-term military commitments in Michigan

    7. Traditional considerations such as voter registration, ownership of real estate, source of driver and vehicle licenses, taxpayer status, and self-supporting or dependency on others, whether residents of Michigan or elsewhere

  7. Determination of Residence: Residence will be determined at the time of initial admission to the University. Questions of residency status should be raised with the Student Accounting Office. If circumstances change to the extent that a student is no longer considered a resident for tuition purposes, the student will be classified as a nonresident after six months.

Note: It is the responsibility of students, prior to registration, to raise questions in the Student Business Services Office regarding their right to be registered as resident students. The administration is authorized to establish procedures and delegate authority for determining the domicile of students for tuition purposes and to make exceptions within the spirit of this policy.

Tuition Reciprocity Agreement with Ohio

Ohio residents may attend Eastern Michigan University at Michigan resident tuition rates, and Michigan residents of Monroe County may attend the University of Toledo at Ohio resident tuition rates. This reciprocity agreement by the Michigan State Board of Education and the Ohio Board of Regents became effective fall 1978 and is periodically re-evaluated.

Payment of Tuition


  1. Log into your my.emich.edu e-mail account, or your forwarded my.emich mail. (If you use a forwarded e-mail address, keep it current.) Each month, you will receive an e-mail notifying you that your bill has been posted. It is the student’s responsibility to check e-mail monthly.

  2. You will need your E-ID and Personal Identification Number (PIN) to access Ebill, EPay and Payment Plans. At my.emich.edu on the bottom of the first page are instructions to access your E-ID and PIN.

  3. View your bill and click on Current Account Activity to view transactions that are posted after the bill is issued. You can also go to your profile and add an alternate e-mail address.

  4. Pay your bill with your checking account routing number (ACH), Master Card, American Express or Discover Card via PayPath. You may pay your bill in person or by mail at 201 Pierce Hall, Ypsilanti MI, 48197. Please write your E-ID on your check payment.

  5. Allow access to parents or other parties by setting them up as authorized users. All you need is their e-mail address. This will allow them to access your bill, pay your bill, and set up a payment plan. An e-mail is automatically sent to the authorized user with sign-in details. The authorized user will create a new password once in the site.

  6. The University offers a payment plan to help manage the cost of education. The cost of the plan is $29 and is added to your installment payments. The plan automatically adjusts as payments or charges are added to your account. To enroll, simply log into the Ebill site at: https://ebill.emich.edu. Click on Payment Plan, at the bottom of the Ebill site, and follow the four simple steps to enroll in the plan. We hope you enjoy this added convenience and we welcome any questions you may have.

  7. If you have any questions about the system, please send your e-mail to ebill@emich.edu.

EMU’s optional installment payment plan is offered in the fall and winter semester only and is applicable to tuition and room and board. A minimum of 50 percent must be paid initially and the remainder by the eighth week of the semester. EMU’s optional installment payment plan is offered in the fall and winter semesters only and is applicable to tuition and room and board. A minimum of 50 percent must be paid initially and the remainder by the eighth week of the semester. An installment service fee of $29 is assessed with the first installment billing and a late payment fee of $36 per month is assessed on past-due balances.

If a student’s account is past due for a current semester, enrollment, University housing and other University services (such as the release of transcripts) are subject to suspension until the account is brought into current status. Payment of assessments for a current semester does not relieve the student of obligation for payment of any balance from a prior semester.

Late Registration Fee

A late registration fee of $120 is charged to those students who do not complete registration before the official first day of classes each semester. Checks returned by a bank constitute late registration, resulting in a fee charge. Students enrolling for a course after the mid-point of the semester will be charged an additional $120 late fee.

Cancellation of Registration

Registered students who decide before classes begin not to return to EMU must complete a Cancellation of Registration form or send a letter to the Office of Records and Registration. Any housing contracts must also be canceled in the Housing Office in order to cancel tuition and room/board assessments.

Withdrawal from the University


Complete withdrawal from the University must be requested in writing through the Office of Records and Registration. Any tuition/fee adjustment responding to a written request is based on the postmark date of the request. The policy for withdrawal and tuition adjustment from the University is:

  1. First Eight Days (four days for summer): Students receive a 100 percent tuition credit adjustment, less a $43 non-refundable registration fee. No grades will be posted.

  2. Ninth through 19th Day (fifth through 10th day for summer): Students receive a 50 percent tuition credit adjustment, less a $43 non-refundable registration fee. Grades of W will be posted.

  3. Twentieth through 38th Day (11th through 19th day for summer): Students receive a 25 percent tuition credit adjustment, less a $43 non-refundable registration fee. Grades of W will be posted.

  4. Thirty-ninth Day (20th day for summer) through the First Day of Final Examinations: Students receive no tuition credit adjustment. Grades of W will be posted.

  5. After the First Day of the Final Examination Period: No withdrawal will take place.

Tuition Credit for Reduced Load


A tuition credit adjustment of 100 percent minus the $43 non-refundable registration fee will be made for students who decrease their academic load prior to the eighth business day of the fall/winter semesters (fourth day for summer). These dates are published each semester online, and in the class schedule book. No credit adjustments will be made after the above dates.

Suspended or Dismissed Students


A student who is suspended or dismissed from the University during a semester will receive a tuition credit adjustment based on the withdrawal schedule above. Any tuition/fee adjustment will be based on the date the appropriate University administrator notified the student of suspension or dismissal. The date used for housing and food service adjustments will be the day service to the student is terminated.

Applied Music Fee


Students accepted for private music lessons will be charged an applied music fee. Consult the Music and Dance Department for current rates. Fees are not refundable after the first lesson.

Responsibility for Financial Obligations


A student is eligible for registration or graduation only if all financial obligations to the University have been met. Transcripts and diplomas will be withheld and the student will be ineligible for further registration until all obligations have been fulfilled.

Institute for the Study of Children, Families and Communities

David Clifford, director
Address: 203 Boone Hall
Phone: 734.487.0372
Fax: 734.487.0284
E-mail: david.clifford@emich.edu
Web site: www.iscfc.emich.edu

The Institute for the Study of Children, Families and Communities is an interdisciplinary applied research unit. It is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life in society. Its focus upon human capital development and community growth embraces, in addition to research, demonstration projects, technical assistance, consultation, training, assessment and policy analysis and advocacy. The institute executes its mission through its three centers.

The Center for Applied Research (CAR) provides a full range of research services including needs assessments, asset mapping, survey research, program monitoring and evaluation, data collection and analysis, and policy impact analysis. The CAR includes a state-of-the-art Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing facility, the CATI Lab. Director: Peggy Wiencek, M.S., e-mail: peggy.wiencek@emich.edu

The Center for Child and Family Programs (CCFP) focuses on vulnerable children, families and marginalized youth. The CCFP conducts applied research and program evaluation, develops training curricula, provides technical assistance and develops policy recommendations at the local, state and national levels. Director: Valerie Polakow, Ph.D., e-mail: valerie.polakow@emich.edu

The Center for Community Building and Civic Engagement (CCBCE), newly funded through a U.S. Department of Justice grant, operationally extends EMU’s mission as a metropolitan University into the greater community. Through projects such as the HUD Community Outreach Partnership Center, it promotes community capacity building, youth violence reduction and a range of community-University collaborations.

Director: Elvia R. Krajewski-Jaime, Ph.D., e-mail: ekrajewski@emich.edu

University Library

Bruce T. Halle Library

Rachel J. Cheng, University librarian
Address: 955 West Circle Drive
Phone: 734.487.0020 ext. 2200
Fax: 734.484.11 51
Web site: www.emich.edu/halle

The Bruce T. Halle Library supports the academic mission of the University through its state-of-the-art services, collections, technologies, facilities and equipment.

The Library is a vital component of the University’s educational mission. It houses more than one million items including books, journal subscriptions, microforms, audiovisual materials and U.S. Government Documents. The library has a rapidly growing collection of state-of-the-art electronic indexes and full-text ejournals and ebooks. The library contains special collections of faculty publications, children’s literature, maps, African-American history and also houses the University Archives. These extensive collections are focused to provide strong support for the instructional programs of the University. More information about the library’s collections, hours, and services is available at www.emich.edu/halle.

In addition to its collections, Halle Library provides the campus with venues where people can gather to share ideas and learn including meeting/classrooms, computer labs, a 90-seat auditorium, group study rooms, a TV studio, and the Paradox Café. The Library provides hundreds of public access computers. A unique feature of the Library is the Automated Retrieval Collection (ARC). The ARC’s massive robot cranes locate and move the hundreds of bins that hold more than a half-million books, videos and other items from the Library’s collection. Materials from the ARC can be in your hands within ten minutes.

Materials, including reserved reading materials assigned for use in course work, are checked-in and out on the main floor at the Circulation Desk. The Information Desk is located in the center of the first floor atrium and is the place where all library users may get assistance in using the collections and locating sources. For off-campus class students, the library offers reference assistance and instruction, access to research tools and access to materials. For more information, visit www.emich.edu/halle/offcampusclasses.

Collections on the main floor include the references, legal reference collections and maps. The second floor contains the journals, newspapers, government documents and children’s literature collections and provides space for collaborative study. The third floor contains the circulating book collection and is the Quiet Study Floor.

Librarians offer a comprehensive range of orientation, reference and instructional services and are available to consult with users concerning their information needs, and to assist in developing search strategies and accessing resources. Subject-specialist librarians assist teaching faculty by working with them to design tours and instructional sessions for their classes. Appointments can be scheduled with individual librarians through the Information Services Office (734.487.0020, ext. 2100).

The Academic Projects Center (Halle Room 104) offers one-to-one writing, research, and technology assistance for all EMU students. The APC is a collaboration between the University Library, Academic Technology and Computing Services, the University Writing Center, and the Writing Across the Curriculum and First Year Writing Programs. The APC offers point-of-need help with research, writing, and technology to students working on research papers and other academic projects. University Writing Center consultants, Halle Librarians, and technologists work together in the center to provide project-oriented support.

Information and Communications Technology

To learn more about the technology services provided for students, faculty and staff, visit the IT web site at http://it.emich.edu/.


Computers on Campus

Lab locations:

Morell D. Boone Computing Commons
Address: G07 Bruce T. Halle Library
Phone: 734.487.2121

Multimedia Commons
Address: Bruce T. Halle Library, first floor
Phone: 734.487.2687

Computer Lab
Address: 2nd Floor, Student Center
Phone: 734.487.1365

Owen Computing Lab
Address: 101 Owen Building
Phone: 734.487.2241

Some of the colleges and departments have specialty labs available for different uses. Your professor will tell you about using these specialty labs. If you would like to know more, visit the website of you specific college or department.

IT Computer Help Desk

Address: 106 Halle Library
Phone: 734.487.2120
Web site:  http://www.emich.edu/it/

The IT Computer Help Desk can assist you with problems accessing EMU’s Internet-based resources such as my.emich or the residence hall network (ResNet). Check the IT Help Desk web site for more information on protecting your computer from viruses and other malicious programs.

my.emich Portal Account

my.emich is Eastern Michigan University’s personal portal. It is an official form of communication with EMU. This secure site provides students, faculty and staff with excellent intranet and Internet services including a 20 MB e-mail account and calendar. It is where you can check e-mail, access EMU’s Web, register for classes, check your grades and pay tuition through e-Bill. For complete information on setting up your account, please visit the my.emich web site at: http://my.emich.edu and single click on “How Do I Get my user name and password.”

EMU Computer Store

Address: 101A EMU Student Center
Phone: 734.487.2400
Web site: www.emich.edu/computerstore

Eastern Michigan University’s Computer Store is the location for students, faculty and staff to purchase computers, software and related products at an educational discount. The IT Computer Store web site provides information on hardware, software, special promotions and details about the computer refresh program.

ResNet

ResNet is Eastern Michigan University’s residence hall network service. ResNet uses dedicated Ethernet wiring to connect students to the University network and the Internet, and works much like DSL or cable modem. Service is provided free of charge to students living in University Housing residence halls.

Advantages of ResNet: ResNet is convenient, requiring no modem or phone line to connect; ResNet is fast; and ResNet is a 10Mbit/sec Ethernet network.

To sign up for ResNet, plug in and go through the simple registration process. For more detailed information about ResNet, visit the IT web site at http://it.emich.edu/.

Wireless Networking

Wireless networking is available to students, faculty and staff in select locations on campus. Wireless networking allows those with a wireless compatible laptop computer, and a my.emich user name and password, to connect to the campus network without being “plugged in.” For more details about the EMU Wireless network and responses to frequently asked questions, visit the IT web site at http://it.emich.edu/