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    Eastern Michigan University
   
 
  Jan 19, 2018
 
 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog THIS IS NOT THE CURRENT CATALOG. LINKS AND CONTENT ARE OUT OF DATE!

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PHY 100 - Physics for Elementary Teachers (Gen Ed Area IV)


Designed to stimulate interest in physics by the use of simple and inexpensive equipment to demonstrate scientific principles. Motion, forces, sound, light, heat, electricity and magnetism.

Credit Hours: 3 hrs
Notes: Does not count toward a physics major or minor. Open only to students pursuing any curriculum for elementary teachers.

Area IV: Knowledge of the Disciplines

PHY 100 Physics for Elementary Teachers
This course includes 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory each week. In this course all elementary education students are introduced to the cor acknowledge used in physics to understand phenomenon. This knowledge is an important foundation for studying the other sciences required of the elementary teacher and shows very practically both how physics manifests in our everyday lives and how these concepts can be presented in the elementary classroom. This core knowledge is the same core knowledge used by scientists in every laboratory in the world. The appropriate terminology is introduced and students are shown how to “scale it down” to the elementary student’s vocabulary. The assumptions and shortcomings of models are highlighted. Whenever possible, appropriate simple demonstrations are used. Students are asked to estimate results, mathematics and models are used to predict results, and the results are compared with the student’s intuition. Modern applications are discussed to guide students to become scientifically literate citizens who are capable of making informed decisions about scientific information.


Fall 2017 Course Schedule

Winter 2018 Course Schedule




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