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    Eastern Michigan University
   
 
  Nov 23, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog
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AFC 244 - Dimensions of Racism | GEGA or GEKS


This course examines various theoretical approaches to the concepts of race, ethnicity, and diversity. This course offers the opportunity to acquire an understanding of the interrelated dynamics that diversity of people, culture, religious beliefs, and ideologies play in the creation of new nations; how they can determine political and/or economic alliances; how they can shape or reshape the global order; how they can influence systems of exclusion and produce practices of intolerance.

Credit 3 hrs May not be repeated for additional credit
Grade Mode Normal (A-F)

Class-Level Restriction Undergraduate standing

Notes | Students may earn credit towards Global Awareness (GEGA)  or Knowledge of the Disciplines-Social Sciences (GEKS) , not both.

Using the Afrocentric paradigm, a privileged critical theoretical framework and methodology to address relations of power and privilege, domination and oppression, concepts of superior and inferior civilizations, cultures, and societies that are difficult to deconstruct within traditional western perspectives, Dimensions of Racism prepares students to examine various theoretical approaches to the concepts of race, ethnicity, and diversity. The goal is to help students understand their culture and cultural practices and the interrelated dynamics that the diversity of peoples, cultures, and religious beliefs on the one hand; and ideological and political foundations of social stratification based on systems of power, oppression, and prejudice, on the other, play in the creation of new nations; how they can determine political and/or economic alliances; how they can shape or reshape the global order; how they can influence systems of exclusion and produce practices of intolerance. As such, in discussing these issues both at a national, international, and global level, this course meets the outcomes for Global Awareness .

Students will develop knowledge of ethnographic methods and techniques in social scientific research and Africology & African American Studies. In addition students learn how to develop research questions that reflect an understanding of the discipline in which they are asked; how to conduct cross-cultural analysis of data; and understand how knowledge is developed and disseminated from the perspective of the ontology and epistemology of race and the impact of its regulatory powers within society at national and international level. Students learn how to use social science methods of describing, exploring, explaining, and comparing to engage in the systematic study and understanding of societies and cultures and relations of power that govern and shape them. This course explores a broad range of topics and methods in the Social Sciences approach under the discipline of Africology both at national, international, and global level. As such, this course meets the outcomes for Knowledge of the Disciplines-Social Sciences .
Updates Approved for Gen Edu 1/2016, effective Fall 2016; New Course 11/14, effective Summer 2015


Fall 2017 Course Schedule

Winter 2018 Course Schedule




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